Rich dating age man victorian england

Rich dating age man victorian england

Roman Green Man (c. 1st or 2nd Century CE) in Musйe de Vйsone, Pйrigueux, Dordogne, France (photo Julianna Lees)

It was Roman artists and sculptors who first developed composite figures (such as those in Nero’s Golden House in Rome), as well as complex carvings of life-like intertwined vegetation. Roman architecture sometimes features ornate leaf masks, which are usually taken as showing the close interdependence between man and nature, and as describing the deities of Pan, Bacchus, Dionysus or Silvanus, and the mystery religions that grew up around them. A leaf-clad statue of Dionysus in Naples, Italy, dating back to about 420 BCE, is often considered one of the first Green Men images.

Indeed, Dionysus is often considered one of the most likely precursors to the Green Man of the Middle Ages, especially given his usual portrayal as leaf-crowned lord of the wilderness, nature and agriculture - it was only later that he became associated with wine, ecstasy and sexual abandon - and his parallel role (in the guise of Okeanus) as a god of the underworld, of death and rebirth. An acanthus-sprouting head of Okeanos (a Greek/Roman figure with links to Dionysus), dating to the 6th Century CE and found in the old Byzantine city of Mudanya, Turkey, appears to have served as a model for several later carvings in Europe.

However, there are similar figures represented in ancient cultures which had little or no Roman influence. The Mesopotamian Green Man carving at al-Hadr or Hatra (present-day Iraq) may date from as early as 300 BCE. A temple to Bacchus at Baalbek, Lebanon, dating from the 2nd Century CE, shows a full leaf-mask distinctly reminiscent of later Green Men. There are many examples of leaf masks from ancient Constantinople (such as those now kept in the Archaeological Museum in Istanbul), although this appears not to have been a tradition carried on within the later Eastern church. Figures similar to the Green Man also appear in Borneo, Nepal and India, one of the earliest of which is a disgorging head which appears on an 8th Century CE Jain temple in Rajasthan, India.

Disgorging Green Man on the tomb of St. Abre (c. 4th or 5th Century CE), now in the church of St.-Hilaire-le-Grand at Poitiers, France (photo Julianna Lees)

Just as early statues of the Virgin Mary and her child (particularly the Black Madonnas which were popular in Europe in the early medieval period) were clearly variations of earlier representations of similar pagan myths (e.g. Isis and Horus, Cybele and Attis, Aphrodite and Adonis, etc), early portrayals of the Green Man were largely based on older models from antiquity. In an interesting cross-cultural exchange, some sculptures of leaf-masks were plundered from older Byzantine buildings and re-used intact in Christian churches, as seems to have occurred in Trier Cathedral in German in the 6th Century CE. However, other leaf masks at Trier (the oldest city in Germany) date back to the 2nd or 3rd Century CE.

Although the leaf-mask or foliate head had been copied since Roman times, perhaps the first example of the disgorging form of the Green Man occurs on the tomb of St. Abre, now in the church of St.-Hilaire-le-Grand at Poitiers, France, which is thought to date from the 4th or 5th Century CE. This type of Green Man image appears to have no real precedent in Roman or Celtic art (even the somewhat similar Indian disgorging head in Rajasthan actually dates from some three centuries later), and its origins are altogether more mysterious.

It is perhaps an indication of the Green Man’s power as an archetype that he was able to transfer so seamlessly from one culture and one set of beliefs to another. For example, many of the Green Man images that began to appear in the intricately illustrated Christian manuscripts of Ireland, such as the 8th Century “Book of Kells”, exhibit direct influences from Roman and Egyptian art, and some of these styles spread rapidly from there to much of the rest of Western Europe.

Gradually, then, over a period from roughly the 6th to 11th Century, a bridge was laid between the Green Man’s apparently pagan origins and the new context of Christian art, and he imperceptibly became absorbed into Christian iconography. What could be salvaged or used from the old pagan beliefs was co-opted by Christianity as far as possible, and what was considered too disruptive or dangerous was strenuously repressed. Although the popular practice of tree worship could not be permitted - many sacred trees and groves were cut down or torched by over-zealous priests during this period - the use of the image of the Green Man allowed a relatively safe nod towards the old practices, while at the same time bringing it under the umbrella of the new Church. To some extent, the Green Man became an instrument of harmony between the pagan past and the new Christian order.

Having said that, though, the number of occurrences of the Green Man during this period was relatively small, and the Dark Ages largely represents a time of abeyance for the Green Man phenomenon, almost as though he were biding his time until the conditions were right for his resurgence.

Green Man or Beast (c. 12th Century) in Church of Saint Mary and Saint David in Kilpeck, Herefordshire, England (photo Simon Garbutt)

There was a huge revival in ecclesiastical building during this period, in what was seen by many as a time of hope after the bleakness of the Dark Ages. But, critically, this was also a time of greatly increasing prosperity, during which the Church expanded its influence and its riches many-fold, and during which rich and powerful feudal lords were keen to ingratiate themselves with the mighty Church.

The intricate Romanesque and Gothic architecture of the High Middle Ages provided a perfect vehicle for the inclusion of all manner of oddities on church buildings. Grotesques of many kinds were introduced, superficially to exemplify passions and desires that pious men needed to overcome, and Green Men were perhaps just one example of the mythical beasts, demons and other pagan symbols which began to be licensed, even encouraged, by church builders of the time. Sheela-na-gigs (figurative carvings of naked women displaying an exaggerated open vulva, sometimes considered a Green Woman, the female counterpart of the Green Man) and sirens or mermaids with divided tails were just some of the other recurring motifs to be found along with the Green Man. The interwoven Romanesque leaf decorations provided an easy linking theme between such images, and some quite large-scale carvings of naked men and women caught up in the tendril of vegetation are found on major church buildings of the period (such as the cathedrals at Lincoln and Chartres, for example).

It was also around this time that exhibitionist figures, with exaggerated genitalia and indulging in all kinds of deviant sexual practices, began to crop up in Spanish, French and British churches, supposedly in an attempt to teach the deplorable effect of lust. In the wake of the Christian victories in the Crusades, many Muslim craftsmen began to be employed in church architecture and ornamentation (particularly in France and Spain, and especially in churches of the Cluniac order), bringing a Moorish influence and sensibility, and the Green Man is a notably popular figure in many of these buildings.

Around the 13th Century, the French style of foliate mask began to prevail, although the disgorging style of Green Man was more predominant in England. Both main types flourished thoughout France, Britain and Germany, though. Chartres Cathderal, widely considered one of the masterpieces of Western art, features up to 70 Green Men, in a whole variety of different forms, including leaf masks, disgorgers of vegetation, and human figures in the midst of plants and fruit.

Good examples of medieval Green Men can be found in cathedrals, abbeys, minsters and humble parish churches throughout Britain (particularly in rural counties like Devon, Somerset, Oxfordshire, Norfolk, etc), France and Germany. A selection of photos is included in the Photo Gallery of this website.

Bronze door bell in the form of a Green Man on the island of Murano, near Venice, Italy

Interestingly, other than few examples of geuinely old Green Men in Milan, Bologna and the Bari area of southern Italy, there is relatively little Green Man imagery in the medieval and Gothic architecture of Italy, but with the Renaissance it finally makes an appearance. Mantegna, Donatello and Michelangelo all used the motif, including several examples in Michelangelo’s decoration of the Medici Chapel in Florence.

With the Protestant Reformation of the 16th Century, the Green Man experienced something of a new, and largely secular, resurgence, as he became associated (somewhat paradoxically) with the drive for productivity and dominion over Nature. His image appeared on furnishings, embroideries, panelling, chimneypieces, and even on cannons and pistols. At times the images verge on the caricature, such as Giuseppe Arcimboldo’s famous portraits of the Emperor Rudolph II composed entirely of fruits and vegetables.

The advent of mass-produced printed works saw his image used on the title plates of many books, from Bibles to theological treatises to secular works. There are several 16th Century pictures apparently associating Martin Luther in particular with the foliate head of the Green Man, and many of his works published in Wittenberg bear the image of the Green Man on their title pages. References, albeit largely indirect, appeared in the written works of Rabelais, Shakespeare, Milton and Marvell.

The Green Man continued to appear in English architecture in the 16th and 17th Century, such as at King’s College in Cambridge, St. Paul’s Cathedral in London, Tewkesbury Abbey, and in country churches like those at Shepton Mallet and High Bickington. He received a minor boost in popularity with the story of Charles II’s escape and sanctuary in the “Royal Oak”. The Green Man became a popular name for English pubs in the 17th Century (when the Distiller’s Company Green Man and Still heraldic arms were in common use), although most inn signs tended to depict a forester, a wild man or even Robin Hood, rather than the traditional Green Man of Church architecture. But the frequency of his appearances during this period is certainly much reduced compared to earlier centuries and, arguably, some of the depth of symbolic meaning has been lost by this time.

A 12m tall sculpture of a Green Man by Tawny Gray (Toin Adams) at the Custard Factory, Birmingham, England (from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Man)

Indeed, one might have expected the Green Man to disappear completely in this age of science and rationality, and for a time he seemed to have done just that. But he never entirely faded away. The motif gained some renewed popularity with the Gothic Revival and Arts and Crafts movements of 19th Century Britain, as well as in America and the British colonies during this same period. The Victorian version of the Green Man makes an appearance on many important building such as the Palace of Westminster, St. David’s Cathedral and in re-carvings on some Oxford and Cambridge colleges. The Green Man has continued to make appearances in more modern architecture and design, from brick-built terraced houses and suburban villas to pubs, banks, factories and other commercial buildings.

The Green Man has also become a popular figure in modern art of various kinds, from Paul Sivell’s Whitefield Green Man wood carving, to David Eveleigh’s Penpoint Green Man Millennium Maze, to Tawny Gray’s 12m tall Green Man sculpture in Birmingham, to M.J. Anderson’s marble sculptures, and the Australian Graham Wilson’s Banksia Man sculpture. He has appeared in many modern paintings and illustrations (such as in the art of Brian Froud, Peter Pracownik, John Piper, Rob Juszak, Jane Brideson, Alan Caiger-Smith, Dorothy Bowen, Monica Richards, among others), and even in full-body tattoos.

Many modern Neo-Pagan, New Age and Wiccan organizations and practitioners have incorporated the Green Man into their artwork and symbology, and he is sometimes used as a representation of the Horned God (which is itself a syncretic deity inclusive of several ancient pagan gods such as the Celtic Cernunnos and the Greek Pan).

In recent years, the environmental or Green movement and various other campaigns and commercial organizations have also latched onto (some might say hijacked) the Green Man as a marketing tool, and he has begun to emerge once more as something approaching an environmental icon, as can be seen from the variety of companies and organizations taking advantage of his image (see the section on The Green Man in Popular Culture for some examples).

Rich dating age man victorian england

On Sunday, January 22, 2017 at 2:00 in the Beckwith Room, Hildene presents “The Evolution of Lincoln’s Engagement with the Issue of Slavery.” In the wake of the national celebration of civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr.’s January 16th birthday, Hildene President, Seth Bongartz, will shed some light on the complex thinking of one of the nation’s earliest civil rights activists, President Abraham Lincoln.

On September 11 at Hildene, Jane and Ken Moriarty, who have been doing their own canning for years, will lead participants in making a simple tomato sauce in a “how-to-begin home pressure canning workshop.” Starting with how to prepare vegetables through to the finished Mason jar, participants will learn about supplies and techniques that make canning fun and easy. Beyond the two-hour basics class there will be a jar-cooling waiting period for any who wish to stay for a “do-it-yourself” guided round two. All participants will go home with a jar of tomato sauce. The workshop from 1:00 to 3:00 is limited to 15 participants. $15 for Hildene Members. $20 for non-members. To register call Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or email stephanie@hildene.org.

On Tuesday, August 9, from 3:00 to 4:30 pm, workshop presenters Andrea Luchini, Hildene Horticulturist, and Diane Newton, Hildene Education Director, lead a presentation and discussion on native pollinators, the perils they face, and what to do to enhance their numbers in our own backyards. Following the presentation, participants explore Hildene’s grounds and gardens to observe native pollinators and see how the simple principles of pollinator conservation can be implemented into any landscape. Registration is strongly encouraged: $10 for Hildene members, $15 for non-members. For more information and to register, contact Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or stephanie@hildene.org. Check in at the Welcome Center.

On Thursday, July 14, from 9:30 am to noon, Hildene’s horticulturist, education director and Dene Farm manager will lead a program on the ecology of Hildene’s lower meadows and wetland. Andrea Luchini will discuss the issue of invasive plants. Diane Newton will lead the group into the wetland for a hands-on activity to gain an understanding of the ecosystem and its ecological importance. Brooke Decker will complete the tour with a visit to the adjacent bird sanctuary where she will talk about meadow ecology and efforts to encourage bobolinks and other pollinators.

For more information and to register, contact Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or stephanie@hildene.org.

On Sunday, January 17, 2:00 to 3:00 pm, Hildene President, Seth Bongartz, will deliver a talk on Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address. Bongartz will delve into the meaning, context and present day relevance of the President’s greatest speech, noting that the choice of Martin Luther King weekend for the presentation is opportune.

On Sunday, July 26, family, friends and colleagues gathered for a celebratory luncheon at Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home, to honor Susanne Rappaport posthumously and Jane Beck. The award is given annually to Vermonters who have made extraordinary contributions in the areas of land conservation and/or historic preservation. Collectively Rappaport and Beck have dedicated nearly 100 years to preserving the stories, traditions and legacies of Vermonters. Jane Beck, Vermont’s first and longest serving folklorist is Director Emeritus of the Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. Susannne Rappaport was recognized for her body of work in 2014 when she received the Vermont Historical Society’s prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award. Both clearly fit the profile of past Hildene Award honorees, Senator James Jeffords, Darby Bradley, Linda Ramsdell, Andrea Rogers, and Paul Bruhn. The important work of past and present recipients is the embodiment of Hildene’s mission, Values into Action.

2015 Hildene Award honorees, Jane Beck and Susanne Rappaport, collectively devoted nearly 100 years of their lives to preserving the stories, traditions and legacies of Vermonters. Their efforts have enabled future generations to learn about, experience and interact with their Green Mountain State heritage. During her lifetime the preservation work of West Pawlet resident Susanne Rappaport focused mainly on her own small town and the quarries of the Slate Valley, while folklorist Jane Beck’s efforts have taken her to virtually every corner of the state. The achievements of both are remarkable. These women can best be described as tireless researchers, collectors and preservers of Vermont’s past, clearly fitting the profile of past Hildene Award honorees as “Vermonters who have made extraordinary contributions in the areas of land conservation and/or historic preservation.“

Vermont’s first and longest serving folklorist, Jane Beck, is Director Emeritus of the Vermont Folklife Center in Middlebury. Founded by Beck in 1983, the Center is dedicated to documenting Vermont’s unique culture. Jane has dedicated her life to documenting Vermont’s distinctive heritage, recording and archiving more than 4,000 interviews with Vermonters of all backgrounds. The Green Mountain State’s folk artists are recognized and celebrated through oral histories and exhibits at the Center, a special place also known for the outstanding public education, research and archival services it provides to the state and its people. Paul Bruhn, Executive Director of The Preservation Trust of Vermont, notes that, “Without Jane’s vision, hard work and perseverance, the Vermont Folklife Center would not have happened.” She has been the recipient of numerous prestigious awards including: The Governor’s Extraordinary Vermonter Award (1990); The American Folklore Society’s Benjamin Botkin Award (1996); and in 2004, the Vermont Governor’s Award for Excellence in the Arts.

One of Jane Beck’s more remarkable discoveries was Daisy Turner and her epic story. She was the 100 year old daughter of former slaves who was living in Grafton. Jane not only documented Daisy’s life through interviews, but she helped preserve the Turner Farm, buildings and landscape, making it an important cultural heritage landmark and now a site on the Vermont African American Heritage Trail. Jane has a book forthcoming on the life of the woman who became her dear friend, Daisy Turner.

Susanne Rappaport received the Vermont Historical Society’s Lifetime Achievement Award In October 2014, just three months before her passing. It came as no surprise to those who knew her, for those in her hometown and environs had long valued her restoration of the 1852 one room schoolhouse in West Pawlet, a 1920’s theatre curtain in Pawlet’s town hall auditorium, her work with the students at Mettawee School and most importantly to Susanne, her mentoring of so many in the art of preserving the past. As a volunteer curator of the Pawlett Historical Society, Susanne is credited with the preservation of historical collections for study and research, among them the multi-media collection of artist Katherine McCabe and the Ekwanok Country Club’s historical archive. Susanne was also the first professional curator, collections consultant, and educator at the Dorset Historical Society and was Hildene’s first education director. As founding executive director of the Slate Valley Museum, Susanne undertook the daunting task of preserving the slate industry’s history for generations to come, diligently documenting the story of the immigrant quarrymen who left their homes in Europe to quarry the veins along the New York/Vermont border. This work garnered her the George Jones Award for Preservation of Welsh American Heritage. In her own words, she did all these things because of her deep seated belief that, “Many think historic preservation is concerned with only bricks and mortar, but I think of it as the intellect and heart. We build the stories to explain the pictures. Long after buildings are gone, the stories will be told hopefully touching the hearts of generations to come.”

A personal story of the heart came full circle for Susanne when she completed a book she began with her husband, renowned photographer, Neil Rappaport, nearly 50 years ago. Over those many years, Susanne chronicled the stories of the Vermonters Neil photographed. Following his death in 1998, she committed to completing the work and in 2005, Message from a Small Town : Photographs Inside Pawlet, Vermont was published by, none other than, The Vermont Folk Life Center which is the creation of Hildene Award co-honoree Jane Beck.

The contributions of Jane Beck and Susanne Rappaport will be celebrated by family, friends and colleagues at a luncheon honoring them at Hildene on Sunday, July 26 at 12:00. Hildene believes it is the perfect opportunity to both recognize each of their achievements and provide a time and place for the public to show their gratitude for their work. The Hildene Award, given annually to a deserving Vermonter(s) selected by Hildene’s Board of Trustees, includes a $10,000 prize that will go to a project of the recipient’s choosing. This year Susanne Rappaport’s is a posthumous award, therefore the 2015 project will be chosen by Jane Beck. One of the highlights of the July 26th luncheon will be the announcement of the project to which the honorees’ award will be gifted.

Past Hildene Award winners include Senator James Jeffords, Darby Bradley, Linda Ramsdell, Andrea Rogers, Paul Bruhn and Sarah Dopp. The twin pillars of the award, land conservation and historic preservation, are intrinsically tied to Hildene’s 412 acres and 14 historic buildings. Those who have been and will be honored embody Hildene’s mission of Values into Action.

This Hildene program is open to the public. If you wish to attend the luncheon, the cost is $30 per person, $20 for Hildene members and volunteers. This includes admission to Hildene for the day. Reservations are required. For more information or to make a reservation, contact Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or stephanie@hildene.org by July 17.

“Dene,” the second half of Hildene, the name that presidential son Robert Lincoln gave to his Manchester estate in 1905 means “valley with stream.” On Tuesday, July 14, from 2:00 to 5:00pm, participants will take an ecotour of Hildene’s approximately 200 acres of valley with stream consisting of meadow, forest, wetland, spectacular vistas and the Battenkill.

President Lincoln appealed to “the better angels of our nature” when he urged citizens to rededicate themselves to the promise of American democracy as “the last best hope of earth.” Award-winning producer and director Daniel Karslake will likewise reawaken “the better angels of our nature” when he delivers the inaugural talk for Hildene’s Last Best Hope series. On Thursday, September 18, 5:30 to 6:30 pm, at Hildene, Mr. Karslake will explore what it means to rise above cynicism and to find fulfillment in choosing action over apathy in order to make the world a better place. The annual Last Best Hope series seeks to inspire people to become a part of something larger than themselves echoing Hildene’s mission: Values into Action.

Mr. Karslake’s highly acclaimed work deals with social justice issues both domestic and international. His film For the Bible Tells Me So, a Sundance Film Festival favorite and a 2008 Academy Award short-list film, was recognized by Entertainment Weekly magazine as one of five films that have changed the world. Anticipation is building for his next film, Every Three Seconds, which is to be released this fall. The film examines the role each of us can play in ending two of mankind’s greatest challenges: global hunger and extreme poverty.

Mr. Karslake is president of DK Works, a production company dedicated to creating high quality, thought-provoking theatre, television and film. He teaches documentary filmmaking at Duke University. He has also been a visiting scholar at Stanford University where he first began work on Every Three Seconds. Prior to his documentary film work, Mr. Karslake was an Emmy Award nominated producer of the PBS newsmagazine In the Life.

While this program is free and open to all, reservations are strongly recommended as seating is limited. Call Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or email her at stephanie@hildene.org.

he winners of the 2014 Hildene Essay Competition were selected from 159 entries submitted by Vermont public, independent and home study eighth grade students. In the words of Hildene President, Seth Bongartz, “The program’s goal is to promote awareness in the minds of a young generation of Americans of the contributions of this nation’s 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. This is an objective that fits squarely within Hildene’s mission: “Values into Action.”

The students who accepted this year’s challenge were required to respond to the following question in an essay of no more than 500 words: Abraham Lincoln persevered, against all odds, to advance the cause of liberty and justice for all. Identify a leader who is currently striving locally, nationally or globally to make the world a better place, despite considerable obstacles. Explain why she or he inspires you and compare his or her leadership qualities with those of Lincoln’s. Essays were evaluated by a panel of judges based on the content, the students’ understanding of the subject and her or his ability to convey that understanding using good writing practices including style, composition, grammar and factual accuracy.

Hildene applauds all participating students and teachers and congratulates the 2014 winners: First Place, $1,000, Zoe Moskowitz, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Second Place, $750, Cara Davis, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Third Place, $500, Aidan May, Mt. Abraham Union Middle/High School, Bristol; Honorable Mentions, $200 each: Tori Bergstein, Charlotte Central School, Charlotte; Mae Gwenna Chalmers, Stratton Mountain School, Stratton; Theodore Davis, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Molly Kenny, Albert D. Lawton Middle School, Essex Junction; Caroline Saba, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Ruby Smith, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Kathryn Turnbull, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington.

The student responses gleaned from the participants show that they chose local, national and global personalities who were culturally diverse and reflected all walks of life. From iconic international leaders to local concerned citizen activists, Vermont classroom teachers to Nascar drivers; U.S. Senators to U. S. Presidents; from Pakistani politicians to a Pakastani student and education activist, these young writers wrote about leaders who, against all odds, made a difference for the better in their sphere of influence and far beyond.

A celebratory luncheon will be hosted by Hildene at the Lincoln family estate on Sunday, May 18, 2014, following a tour of The Lincoln Family Home. Each winner, along with their parents, teachers, and principal will attend as Hildene’s guests. All Hildene Lincoln Essay Competition 2014 winners will receive their awards. The first, second and third place winners will read their essays.

Perfect Wife and Spiral Press Café are this year’s sponsors. This Hildene program is open to the public. For those wishing to attend the luncheon and tour, the cost is $20 per person. This includes admission to Hildene for the day. Reservations are required. For more information or to make a reservation, contact Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or Stephanie@hildene.org.

Hildene has announced that this year’s recipients of the Hildene Award are Paul Bruhn of Burlington and Sarah Dopp of South Burlington. Collectively Bruhn and Dopp have dedicated more than 60 years to conserving the land and preserving the historic structures of Vermont, Bruhn with his nationally recognized leadership of the Preservation Trust of Vermont and Dopp with her dedication to grassroots conservation and preservation initiatives in Chittenden County. Both clearly fit the profile of past Hildene Award honorees as Vermonters who have made extraordinary contributions in the areas of land conservation and/or historic preservation.

This spring Hildene will launch a pilot program called Gardens for Monarchs and Bees where students will learn about the importance of pollinators, including who they are and the threats they face. Most importantly, students will take action on their school grounds to promote and protect them. Participating area schools are Dorset Elementary, Manchester Elementary and Arlington’s Fisher School.

The opening of registration for Hildene summer camps is a local harbinger of spring in The Shires of Vermont. This year, along with perennial favorites like “Bug Bonanza” and “Nets, Buckets and Boots,” Hildene has added a new option for children entering 2nd, 3rd, and 4th grade. Early childhood educator, avid gardener and forager, Ann Hausslein, will introduce campers to “The Wild and Wonderful World of Plants!” These young naturalists will explore the gardens, fields and forests of Hildene to discover and learn how the human and natural worlds are interconnected. They will observe and identify plants through activities, games and projects. From teas to dream pillows to terrariums and vine baskets, campers will make crafts and foods to eat bringing them closer to the natural world around them. Returning this year for children entering 1st, 2nd, and 3rd grade is “Always Artful.” Led by Tinmouth artist and instructor, Bess Lewis, young artists will take inspiration from the beauty of Hildene’s natural landscape, honing their skills in the visual arts of painting, drawing, sculpting and craft making.

Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home, has announced the addition of Richard Fowler, Jr. of Arlington and Bluffton, South Carolina and Peter D. Kinder of E. Dorset and Cambridge, Massachusetts to its Board of Trustees.

Guy Fraker, Lincoln scholar and author of Lincoln’s Ladder to the Presidency: The Eighth Judicial Circuit, will speak at Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home, on Tuesday, Oct. 29. Fraker’s work documents how the time Lincoln spent on the circuit provided him with the perfect setting for his growth and eventual ascendency to the presidency. As a central Illinois lawyer himself, the author knows the 8th Judicial Circuit well. Thus he is able to articulate why it shaped Lincoln significantly. He will point out how the legal and political ideas and language of the nation’s 16th president developed during these formative years riding the circuit, parts of it anti-slavery and parts of it pro-slavery. During this important time he came to understand the thinking behind both positions, further mastering the art of articulating his own anti-slavery beliefs in a manner that could bring those listening over to his way of thinking. History makes it clear that Lincoln never shied away from, and in fact encouraged, civil discourse while discussing the most difficult issues of his time.

Fraker will extract from his book examples of specific ways in which, 148 years after his death, Abraham Lincoln still leads by example, providing models for civil civic discourse, many applicable to the fractured political environment that surrounds Americans today. The Lincoln scholar makes the case that by learning to listen and speak respectfully to those with whom he disagreed, Lincoln set an example that is just as relevant today as it was in the 1850’s. Hildene’s mission Values into Action is rooted in these Lincolnesque notions of civic responsibility and civil civic discourse.

This Hildene program begins at 6:00 pm in the Beckwith Room and is free and open to the public. The 45 minute presentation will be followed by a 15 minute question and answer period. At 7:00 pm Guy Fraker will sign books in The Museum Store.

For further information please contact Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or email Stephanie@hildene.org.

This year’s luncheon honoring the winners of Hildene’s seventh annual Lincoln Essay Competition was held on Sunday, May 19 at The Lincoln Family Home. The eight students feted were among the 145 eighth graders from Vermont’s public, independent and homeschools who accepted the challenge to respond to the following question in an essay of no more than 500 words:

In his presentation, first place winner, Isaac Dodson of Edmunds Middle School, Burlington, shared his point of view on this year’s question. Reading from his essay the young writer said, “Civil discourse is needed in a civil society in order to hear people’s opinions. Even seemingly uncivil actions such as protests are attempts to provoke a civil exchange of ideas.” He goes on to note, “For example, it was uncivil in the late 1880’s for women, such as Susan B. Anthony, to express their political views and to protest. However these women were trying to bring important changes to our society for women. Sometimes in a civil society, planned, nonviolent protests bring attention to unjust situations and offer opportunities for discussion.” This is but a sample of the eloquent and insightful speeches the students shared at Sunday’s event. Their essays can be viewed online in their entirety at www.h ildene.org.

Hildene applauds all participating students and teachers and congratulates the 2013 winners: First Place, $1,000, Isaac Dodson, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Second Place, Sarah Mangiacotti, $750, dual student at Maple Street School, Manchester and Stratton Mountain School; Third Place Tie, $500 each, James Reilly, Maple Street School, Manchester and Rebecca Berlind, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Honorable Mentions, $200 each: Conor Joyce, Hartford Memorial Middle School, White River Junction; Sabrina Amorocho Laing, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Anneka Williams, Harwood Union Middle/High School, Moretown; Maya Homziak, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington.

In his remarks to the students, teachers, families and friends, Hildene Executive Director, Seth Bongartz, congratulated the young scholars on their achievements and emphasized that the competition they took part in is an example of Hildene’s mission, Values into Action. Bongartz noted that, “The purpose of the essay competition is to help bring to future generations not just the responsibility of civic involvement, but the joy and sense of purpose that comes from involvement in something bigger than yourself … Nothing could make Lincoln and the entire Lincoln family happier than to know there is an organization dedicated to bringing core Lincoln values into the twenty first century and beyond. You are the twenty first century!”

The Lincoln Essay Competition and annual luncheon honoring the winners was sponsored by Spiral Press Café and Perfect Wife Restaurant.

To learn more about Hildene and to read the winning essays, visit Hildene’s Facebook page or www.hildene.org/schools.html.

The winners of the 2013 Hildene Lincoln Essay Competition were selected from 145 entries submitted by eighth grade public, independent and home study students coming from 30 Vermont schools. In the words of Hildene Executive Director, Seth Bongartz, “The program’s goal is to promote awareness in the minds of a young generation of Americans of the contributions of this nation’s 16th president, Abraham Lincoln. This is an objective that fits squarely within Hildene’s mission: Values into Action.”

The students who accepted the challenge this year were required to respond to the following question in an essay of no more than 500 words: Is civil discourse necessary for civil society? Sometimes? Always? Never? Support your position. Essays were evaluated by a panel of judges based on the content, the student’s understanding of the subject and his or her ability to convey that understanding using good writing practices including style, composition, factual accuracy and grammar.

Hildene applauds all participating students and teachers and congratulates the 2013 winners: First Place, $1,000, Isaac Dodson, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Second Place, Sarah Mangiacotti, $750, dual student at Maple Street School, Manchester and Stratton Mountain School; Third Place Tie, $500 each, James Reilly, Maple Street School, Manchester and Rebecca Berlind, Edmunds School, Burlington; Honorable Mentions, $200 each: Conor Joyce, Hartford Memorial Middle School, White River Junction; Sabrina Amorocho Laing, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington; Anneka Williams, Harwood Union Middle/High School, Moretown; Maya Homziak, Edmunds Middle School, Burlington.

Student responses came in on the side of “sometimes and always.” “Never” was not an option for them. Some even noted that there have been times in the nation’s history, such as the women’s and civil rights movements, where civil disobedience was used as a method that led to civil discourse. The young essayists drew inspiration from a wide range of sources to come to their conclusions from research to personal experiences. These experiences included town meeting, classroom debates, role models both contemporary and historical, school based programs that address differences, and observations of the dysfunction in government that results from the absence of civil discourse.

A celebratory luncheon will be hosted by Hildene at the Lincoln family estate on Sunday, May 19, 2013, following a tour of The Lincoln Family Home. Each winner, along with their parents, teacher, and principal will attend as Hildene’s guests. All Hildene Lincoln Essay Competition 2013 winners will receive their awards. The first, second and third place winners will read their essays.

Perfect Wife and Spiral Press Café are this year’s sponsors. To learn more about Hildene, visit www.hildene.org or find us on Facebook.

This year’s recipient of the Hildene Award is well known conservationist and past president of the Vermont Land Trust, Darby Bradley. The Hildene Award is given to Vermonters who have made extraordinary contributions in the areas of land conservation or historic preservation. The inaugural award was bestowed on Senator James Jeffords in 2004 for his work helping to preserve the Civil War battlefields upon which Vermonters fought. Those who are honored have lived Hildene’s mission of Values into Action.

The winners of the 2012 Hildene Lincoln Essay Competition were selected from 142 entries submitted by eighth grade public, independent and home study students from 21 Vermont schools. In the words of Hildene Executive Director, Seth Bongartz, the program’s goal is, “to promote awareness in the minds of a young generation of Americans of the contributions of the nation’s 16th President, Abraham Lincoln, the embodiment of civic responsibility. Through this process we also hope to instill awareness of the responsibility each of us has to do our part to make our community, our state, our country and even the world a better place. The essay challenge and resulting submissions collectively fit squarely within Hildene’s mission: Values into Action.”

Springtime guests who venture out on the Hildene Farm Trail this season are certain to notice improvements made to the pond area, a popular site for summer camps such as “Nets, Buckets and Boots” and “Watershed Wonders” or school programs like “Pond Discovery.” A generous grant from The Sarah K. deCoizart Article TENTH Perpetual Charitable Trust made it possible to construct a handicapped accessible path and a combination of fixed and floating platforms at the pond.

On Friday, May 4, children grades K-2 are invited to join Hildene in their annual celebration of Arbor Day at The Lincoln Family Home. More than 135 years ago, agriculturalist, J. Sterling Morton founded Arbor Day with the simple idea of setting aside a special day for tree planting. An idea that Hildene believes is more important than ever.

On Saturday, April 7, author and historian, Jason Emerson, will launch the tour for his new book, Giant in the Shadows: The Life of Robert T. Lincoln at the Manchester, Vermont home of the presidential son and captain of industry. Emerson will present on the book and take questions in the Beckwith Room at 10:00 am and again at 2:00 pm. Each presentation will be followed by a book-signing in The Museum Store.

The Lincolns were often reluctant to leave Hildene as autumn waned and as a result the family celebrated several Christmases here. During this festive season they had their own holiday traditions, and for the past three decades countless families have made a visit to Hildene festooned for Christmas a tradition as well. This year from December 1 through January 2 the house will be decorated and staged as though it were Christmas Eve, 1912, one of the years Robert, Mary and family spent the holidays at their Vermont retreat. From the candlelit windows, winterberries and greenery that greet guests at the port cochere to the center hall yuletide floral arrangement, bursts of evergreen fastened with burgundy satin ribbon and a Christmas tree replete with Victorian ornaments, a sense that the family is preparing for Christmas morning has been created. Greeting cards, stockings hung on the mantle, wrapped parcels and even the menu for Christmas dinner portend of wonderful things to come on Christmas day. During regular hours, 9:30 to 4:30, interpreters and staff are on hand to answer questions about Hildene ’s history and its famous residents.

It’s the time of year when family and friends tend to reflect on the past year giving thanks while looking toward the season of giving. Such is the case when it comes to reporting on another prosperous year for Hildene’s “Plant A Row for the Hungry” Garden. This is a special place on the Lincoln family estate where harvesting and giving go hand in hand. The annual effort combines the collective energy and time (more than 100 hours) of a small but dedicated group of volunteers whose goal is to put food on the tables of those in need. So although the vegetable garden is already asleep for the winter, the memory of what was achieved there remains fresh and is worthy of note here.

Timothy Townsend, historian at Lincoln Home National Historic Site in Springfield, Illinois will make the fourth presentation of the 2011 Hildene Winter History Series on Tuesday, April 12 at 7:00. This year’s thematically linked talks take attendees on a chronological journey following the life of the nation’s 16th president from the perspective of those entrusted with preserving and interpreting the historic properties that he called home. Representatives from each historic site focuses on what makes their particular Lincoln site unique, how it shaped the future president, its mission and how the site is advancing the Lincoln legacy.

On Friday, February 18, Hildene Executive Director, Seth Bongartz and Deputy Director, Laine Dunham represented the Vermont Lincoln site at the New York State Museum at the invitation of State Historian, Robert Weible. February 18, 2011 marked the 150th anniversary of the president’s stopover in Albany on his trip by rail from his Springfield home to his March 4 inauguration in Washington. As part of a national kick off for the multi-year sesquicentennial commemoration of the Civil War the National Park Service is retracing this famous journey.

Just in time for Lincoln’s birthday, Hildene will find itself celebrating the date and honoring Abe in a special way this year. They recently learned that unbeknownst to them, their popular children’s book about the President, Mr. Lincoln’s Gift, A Civil War Story had been awarded an honorable mention at the 2009 San Francisco Book Festival. The exposure this type of recognition in the literary world garners for books, their authors and publishers is significant. For this work, the seventh in the Hildene Library series and its first children’s book, the award was a Lincoln’s birthday gift. It honors not only the author, Whitney Stewart and illustrator, Laine Dunham, but the President himself for an act of personal kindness previously unknown until the author uncovered her storyline in a most unexpected way. It all began when one evening Stewart’s stepfather handed her a box of old letters and photographs that he inherited from his great, great grandfather, artist, Francis B. Carpenter. Among the fragile pieces of paper that dated back to the 1800s, the well known children’s author would discover the seeds of a story for her book, Mr. Lincoln’s Gift.

This story of life in the White House with the 16th President is a newly revealed piece of his legacy. The tale follows Francis Carpenter in his effort to save a wrongly imprisoned soldier, all the while working in the Lincoln White House on his famous painting, “First Reading of the Emancipation Proclamation Before the Cabinet.” The artist was patiently waiting for just the right moment to approach the President about the soldier’s predicament. The story and all the dialogue is documented in Carpenter’s private diary and personal letters, in magazine articles that he wrote and in his book.

This Lincoln tale has a direct connection to Hildene, whose mission is to advance the Lincoln legacy and the President’s highest ideals. The painting that Carpenter was working on in the story was made into an engraving. Lincoln ordered and paid for print #1 but died before the work was completed. This engraving went to Robert and is one of the key pieces in Hildene’s collection today. This historic piece hangs in the current exhibit, “The American Ideal: Abraham Lincoln and the Second Inaugural.”

Hildene guests can purchase Mr. Lincoln’s Gift in The Museum Store. Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home is open daily from 9:30 to 4:30. To learn more about Hildene visit www.hildene.org.

The next Hildene Winter History Series lecture commences at 7:00 pm on Tuesday, February 8 with a presentation by Kendell Thompson, Superintendent at the Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial in Lincoln City, Indiana. His talk will be the second in the series of thematically linked presentations that will take attendees on a chronological journey following the life of the nation’s 16th president from the perspective of those entrusted with preserving and interpreting the historic properties that he called home. Representatives from each of these well-known historic sites will focus on what makes their particular Lincoln home unique, how it shaped the future president, its mission and how the site is advancing the Lincoln legacy.

Presenter Thompson has served in 12 National Park Service areas during his career spanning 32 years with the famed U.S. system entrusted with the mission, “to promote and regulate the use of the … national parks … which purpose is to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and the wildlife therein and to provide for the enjoyment of the same in such a manner and by such means as will leave them unimpaired for the enjoyment of future generations.” `Most recently Thompson was able to “switch sides” when in 2010 he transferred to Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial from Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial. He has worn many hats over his three decades with the Service among them interpreter/educator, resource management specialist, ranger, park planner and park manager. Attendees may look forward to the superintendent’s views on how Lincoln’s time spent at the Indiana site during his formative adolescent to young adult years might have influenced his presidential perspectives on life and a range of issues including but not limited to: slavery, literacy and technology.

Tim Giunan, superintendent of Lincoln’s New Salem State Historic Site in Illinois will be the speaker on March 8. On April 12, historian,Tim Townsend, will travel to Hildene from Springfield, Illinois to represent the Lincoln Home National Historic Site. The series will conclude with a presentation on May 10 by Erin Carlson Mast, director, President Lincoln’s Cottage, Washington, DC. All of the above speakers are passionate about history and the role the site they represent played in the life of the President.

Each Winter History Series talk will be held on the second Tuesday of the month in the Beckwith Room at 7:00 pm. The 45 minute presentation will be followed by a 15 minute question and answer period and all are free and open to the public.

Attendees of this year’s series should plan to spend a bit of extra time at the Welcome Center. The Museum Store will be open before and after each lecture. In February they will be sampling Hildene Farm Artisanal Cheese. Plentiful parking is available. For further information please call Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or email Stephanie@hildene.org.

The excitement is palpable, and the anticipation is building as the Pullman car, “Sunbeam,” enters the final stages of 3 years of refurbishment and prepares to travel the approximately 900 miles from Lancaster, South Carolina to its new home in Manchester, Vermont. The 412 acre Hildene estate that served as the Lincoln family’s residence for 70 years is perfectly suited as a site for Sunbeam, the finest example of a wooden Pullman car in existence. It is after all the ancestral home of Robert Todd Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln. This car came off the line in 1903 during Robert’s tenure as president of the Pullman Company. Acquired in 2007 after an exhaustive two year cross country search, the 65 foot executive car played a role in the histories of three U.S. presidents, William McKinley, Theodore Roosevelt and Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

In the heyday of the nearly 100 year history of the company, more than 100,000 people across the U. S. slept on Pullman cars every day. Thus Sunbeam will be treated as the celebrity it is with an old fashioned parade on June 4 that will take the car south on Route 7A into Manchester Village and down the entrance road at Hildene. Site preparation has begun and planning for a daylong hometown style celebration at Hildene to follow the parade is already underway.

The celebratory welcome planned for Sunbeam seems a fitting way to honor the famous father and son pair, Abraham and Robert Lincoln, and their connections to railroading. President Lincoln signed the Transcontinental Railway Act in 1862, paving the way for a transcontinental railroad destined to bring the entire nation closer together with Americans traveling from coast to coast. Pullman actually built a specially made car for the President but unfortunately it was never used until it became part of the funeral train that brought him home to Springfield after his assassination in 1865. Robert’s connection to railroading began at an early age. He first traveled to Vermont by train as a young man with his mother, Mary Todd and brother Tad during the Civil War and nearly four decades later returned as a successful railroad magnate and captain of industry aboard a Pullman belonging to the company he then presided over. This time, the rails carried him back to purchase land, to plan the design and construction of his ancestral home, Hildene. His personal history with Pullman began when he was counsel to the company. Upon the death of founder George Pullman in 1897 he served briefly as acting president and then as president until 1911. At this point Mr. Lincoln became chairman of the board serving until 1924, two years before his death.

Sunbeam will give Hildene a platform to interpret not only this important chapter in Robert’s life but that of the country during the Gilded Age, a period in our history that gave voice to the labor movement and the rise of the Black middle class with the Pullman porters. Hildene looks forward to the arrival of Sunbeam in June which opens to the public on August 1, 2011.

Hildene is open year round from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm. To learn more about Hildene visit www.hildene.org.

Students participating in this year’s Lincoln Essay Competition are reminded that all essays must be submitted to Hildene no later than 5:00 pm on February 12, 2011, Abraham Lincoln’s birthday. In the fall of 2010 competition packets went out to teachers of 8th grade English, history, and/or social studies, librarians and homeschool networks. With all materials available on line, interested students may enter the competition independently as well. The program’s goal is to promote awareness in the minds of a young generation of the contributions of this nation’s 16th president and to honor his legacy. Through this process Hildene hopes to foster an understanding of the importance of civic responsibility: the thoughtful discourse and active engagement in social and political issues within communities to improve the quality of life for all. Academically, this exercise also reinforces the importance of research, critical analysis and good writing.

The students who accept the challenge this year are required to explain in their own words in a non-fiction essay of no more than 500 words: If Lincoln was willing to tolerate slavery in the southern states, why was he so vehemently opposed to its extension into the territories? To interpret his seemingly ambiguous position on slavery it will be necessary for students to research the president’s evolving views on slavery, as well as those of his contemporaries. To assist them, the competition packet includes background materials such as key Lincoln speeches and examples of winning essays from years past.

Essays will be evaluated by a panel of judges based on the content, the student’s understanding of the subject and his or her ability to convey that understanding using good writing practices including style, composition, factual accuracy and grammar. All winners will be notified by the end of March, however the top three will not find out whether their essay placed first, second or third until the celebratory awards luncheon. The gathering will be at Hildene on Sunday, May 22, 2011, following a tour of The Lincoln Family Home which will include the exhibit, “The American Ideal: Abraham Lincoln and the Second Inaugural.” Each winner, along with their parents and teacher, will attend as Hildene’s guests. The first, second and third place winners will read their essays and receive their awards. Winners will be awarded the following prizes in 2011: First Place, $1,000; Second Place, $750; Third Place, $500; and up to ten Honorable Mentions of $200 each.

The 65 foot long wooden luxury Pullman car, Sunbeam, the finest example of such a restored railcar in existence, opens to the public on August 1, 2011 at the Hildene estate of captain of industry, Robert Lincoln, son of President Abraham Lincoln. The family’s Vermont residence for 70 years and three generations of Lincoln’s descendants was built by Robert and wife Mary in 1905 and will be a fitting home for Sunbeam. Making the Pullman connection at Hildene not only advances the family’s legacy but it symbolically links the lives of the father, Abraham and the son, Robert and their shared belief in the importance of the railroad. There is great anticipation about its arrival in an old fashioned hometown celebratory parade on June 4. This event will mark the culmination of a 2 year nationwide search for the right car, a three year restoration project and a 1,000 mile journey from the restoration site in Lancaster, South Carolina to the 412 acre Lincoln estate.

The ninth Hildene Winter History Series commences at 7:00 pm on Tuesday, January 11 with a presentation by Park Guide Gary Ferguson from Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic Park in Hodgenville, Kentucky. His talk will be the first in the series of thematically linked presentations that will take attendees on a chronological journey that follows the life of the nation’s 16th president from the perspective of those entrusted with preserving and interpreting the historic properties that he called home. Representatives from each of these well known historic sites will focus on what makes their particular Lincoln home unique, how it shaped the future president, its mission and how the site is advancing the Lincoln legacy.

Winter guests arriving at Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home in Manchester,Vermont are struck by its beautiful surroundings and quickly learn why tens of thousands of annual visitors say, “Hildene is so much more than a house museum.” Discovery awaits them as they explore the mansion and grounds that three generations of President Lincoln’s descendants called home for 70 years. Hildene opened to the public in 1978 three years after the death of its last Lincoln inhabitant, Miss Peggy Beckwith. Since that time restoration efforts have been ongoing. There are no more direct Abraham Lincoln descendants.

On Tuesday, January 12, author and historian, Jason Emerson, will make the first presentation of the 2010 Winter History Series, speaking on “Robert Todd Lincoln and His Parents.” The focus of this year’s series is the multifaceted personality and life of Hildene’s own Gilded Age gentleman and former turn of the century Manchesterresident, Robert Todd Lincoln. As the only child of President Abraham Lincoln and wife, Mary, to survive to adulthood, Robert carried what was often seen as a burdensome name and legacy with him throughout his life. In this first talk, Emerson, an emerging Lincoln scholar who is currently completing a biography of Robert Todd Lincoln, will look more closely at Lincoln’s relationship with his famous parents, specifically examining his role as the president’s confidant during the Civil War, and explaining his belief that Mary Todd Lincoln was actually closer to her son Robert than she was to Abraham.

The presenter has written about both Robert’s father and his mother, penning Lincoln, the Inventor in 2009 and The Madness of Mary Lincoln in 2007. Emerson’s new biography of Robert Todd Lincoln will be published by Southern Illinois University Press in 2011. When asked about his decision to write a book about Abe Lincoln’s son, Emerson responded, “It is exciting to write a new, detailed book about Robert Todd Lincoln because every day, in the course of my research both at Hildene and elsewhere, I am finding unknown, unpublished information about RTL, his family, and all the events in his life. If RTL weren’t overshadowed by his father, he would be studied by schoolchildren just for his own accomplishments.” In addition to his books, articles by Emerson have appeared in American Heritage, American History, Civil War Times, Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Lincoln Herald, and Lincoln Forum Bulletin.

Held on the second Tuesday of each month, each Winter History Series talk will be held in the Beckwith Room at 7:00 pm. The 45 minute presentation is followed by a 15 minute question and answer period and all are free and open to the public.

Jason Emerson will present on the following topics throughout the 2010 series: February, 9, “Robert Todd Lincoln as Captain of Industry;” March 9, “Robert Todd Lincoln and African Americans;” and April 13, “Robert Todd Lincoln and his Children and Grandchildren.”

The Museum Store will be open for a cup of coffee and a snack before the event and plentiful parking is available. For further information please contact Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or email Stephanie@hildene.org. December 21, 2009 FAVORITE SON; HILDENE WINTER HISTORY SERIES EXPLORES ONE THEIR OWN

The 2010 Winter History Series will consist of four thematically unified lectures exploring the multifaceted personality and life of its own Gilded Age gentleman and former turn of the century Manchester resident, Robert Todd Lincoln. This year’s sole presenter, Jason Emerson, author and historian, will speak on topics that span Lincoln’s lifetime. Emerson has penned works on both his father, Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln the Inventor and his mother Mary Todd Lincoln, The Madness of Mary Lincoln, as well as numerous articles and book reviews in both scholarly and popular publications. There is great anticipation at Hildene about the book he is currently working on, a comprehensive biography of Robert Todd Lincoln.

Held on the second Tuesday of each month, January through April, each Winter History Series talk will be held in the Beckwith Room at 7:00 pm. The 45 minute presentation will be followed by a 15 minute question and answer period and all are free and open to the public.

On January 12, Emerson focuses on “Robert Todd Lincoln and His Parents” At the February 9 presentation he examines “Robert Todd Lincoln as Captain of Industry.” “Robert Todd Lincoln and African Americans” will be the topic explored on March 9. The series will conclude on April 13 with a presentation on “Robert Todd Lincoln and his Children and Grandchildren.”

The Museum Store will be open for a cup of coffee and a snack before the event and plentiful parking is available. For further information please call Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or email Stephanie@hildene.org.

The second Monday of every month, the Hildene Book Club meets to discuss books on a wide range of relevant topics. Their choice for January is The Americanization of Benjamin Franklin by Gordon S. Wood, a respected scholar of the colonial and Revolutionary periods.

In his review of the book for The Washington Post entitled “How a ‘true-blue Englishman’ became the icon we know so well,” Jonathan Yardley notes that, “Wood’s biography follows two broad lines of inquiry. The first, as its title makes clear, is Franklin’s slow, difficult progress from ardent supporter of England and its empire to a complete reversal that left ‘no one … more committed to American independence than Franklin.’ The other is the powerful sensitivity to social stratification, traceable to his impoverished childhood and adolescence, that implanted in him ‘an anger with those who claimed an undeserved social superiority that would become an important spur to his ambition’.”

Following the book discussion, Hildene Programming Director, Stephanie Moffett Hynds, will welcome the input of club members on relevant topics such as choosing a meeting time that would allow more people to become involved, future book picks and general themes about the direction of the club .

The book club will meet this month in the Beckwith Room of the Welcome Center from 3:30 to 5:00. The group encourages readers to join in when they can. All are welcome to attend. To learn more about the club, contact Stephanie Moffett Hynds at 802.367.7960 or email stephanie@hildene.org.

Celebration of the New Year at Hildene got an early start, when on December 27, Hildene announced that the first Hildene Farm Cheese was ready for tasting. The fresh chevre is proof positive that the three long years of planning, building and working towards the goal of cheesemaking at the Rowland Agricultural Center at Hildene Farm had been well worth the wait.

The entire Hildene family invites the community to sample the new cheese at the Welcome Center during the weekend of January 9 and 10. The season for goat cheese production is nearing an end as the season for kidding begins. While the barn will remain open for public viewing as cheese production with cow’s milk continues throughout the winter, Hildene Farm Cheese, cow or goat, aged or fresh, will not be available for purchase until summer 2010.

To learn more about Hildene, call 802.362.1788 or email info@hildene.org.

The winners of the 2010 Hildene Lincoln Essay Competition were selected from 88 entries submitted by eighth grade students from 14 schools representing 7 counties throughout Vermont. The geographical demographic of those entering was even more diverse than last year, the first year in which the competition went statewide after three successful competitions that were limited to eighth grade students in Bennington County only. The Lincoln Family Home at Hildene congratulates the 2010 winners:First Place, Ciaren Wade, Arlington Memorial High School, Arlington; Second Place, Anna O’Malley, Albert D. Lawton Intermediate School, Essex Junction; Third Place, Sarabeth Rambold, Manchester Elementary/Middle School, Manchester; Honorable Mentions: Fatema Boxwala, Albert Lawton Intermediate School, Essex Junction; Claire Cofelice, Maple Street School, Manchester; Will Helmetag, Long Trail School, Dorset; Caitlin M. Owen, Long Trail School, Dorset and Gailin Leah Higgins Pease, Windsor Junior/Senior High School, Windsor.

The challenge for participating students was to first read “The Prayer of the Twenty Millions,” the open letter to President Lincoln published by abolitionist and influential editor of the New York Tribune, Horace Greeley, on August 19, 1862 calling on the president to free the slaves as a way of weakening the confederacy. They then readLincoln’s reply. Hildene Executive Director, Seth Bongartz, said of the research each young writer was required to do, “The hope is that understanding the letters will help the students understand the underpinnings of the political and sociological process that Lincoln went through building up to the emancipation of the slaves.” Each student was asked to write an essay explaining why Lincoln wrote his response to Horace Greeley.

There is a strong belief at The Lincoln Family Home that the essay competition fits squarely within Hildene’s mission to: “advance the Lincoln legacy through education, commitment to community and active stewardship of the family’s home and land.” To show appreciation for the efforts of the essayists and in recognition of their accomplishment, each winner will be Hildene’s guest at the annual Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon at the Equinox Hotel in Manchester. The event will be held on Saturday, January 30, 2010 at 12:00 noon. The first, second and third place winners will read their essays. It seems an appropriate way to celebrate the birthday of the nation’s greatest president, Abraham Lincoln, by honoring young writers and future leaders for their essays expounding on the thoughts and beliefs of this iconic American leader.

The keynote address will be delivered by Charles Smith. For the past three years, as president of the prestigious Snelling Center for Government, it has been Smith’s responsibility to lead the organization in accomplishing its mission “to foster responsible and ethical civic leadership, encourage public service by private citizens, and promote informed citizen participation in shaping public policy in Vermont.” He will discuss the importance of good governance and civic responsibility, key qualities possessed by Abraham Lincoln, and the importance of instilling them in the nation’s youth. All eight winners will also receive their awards: “$1,000, First Prize; $750, Second Prize; $500, Third Prize; and $200 each, Honorable Mention. The Lincoln Essay Competition and annual Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon are sponsored by Spiral Press Café and The Perfect Wife restaurant.

Reservations are required for the luncheon which is $40 per person. For more information on the event or to reserve a seat call Stephanie at 802.367.7960 or emailStephanie@hildene.org.

On Saturday, February 6, Hildene hosts “Abe Lincoln’s Hat” at 10:00 am in the Beckwith Room. The party will include the annual interactive reading of Abe Lincoln’s Hat, written by Martha Brenner, crafts and of course in celebration of Abe’s birthday, cupcakes! After donning the Lincoln hats they have made, the children will parade up to the mansion to see one of Abe’s real stovepipe hats on display as part of the exhibit, “The American Ideal: Abraham Lincoln and the Second Inaugural.”

Materials fee for the event is $3 per child accompanied by an adult. The suggested age is grades one through four. Space is limited and pre-registration is encouraged.

To pre-register a child for “Abe Lincoln’s Hat” on February 6, call Stephanie at

802.367. 7960 or email Stephanie@hildene.org.

Lincoln Essay Contest Winners Feted At Equinox Luncheon

This year’s Hildene luncheon celebrating Lincoln’s birthday and honoring the winners of the fourth annual Lincoln Essay Competition takes place at the Equinox Resort on January 30 at 12:00 noon. The keynoter will be Charlie Smith of the Snelling Center for Government. Smith will address students, teachers, parents and guests on the importance of instilling the principles of good governance and civic responsibility, and how Abraham Lincoln, in word and deed, exemplified the same. The speaker and his topic are particularly appropriate in light of the fact that the challenge posed for this year’s competition involved an examination of Lincoln’s motives as leader, when he made his famous response to an outspoken critic of his policies regarding slavery in 1862.

Participating young eighth grade writers were asked to submit an essay of no more than 500 words explaining why President Lincoln wrote his response to “The Prayer of the Twenty Millions,” an open letter written to him in the press by abolitionist and influential editor of the New York Tribune, Horace Greeley. The letter called upon the president to free the slaves as a way of weakening the confederacy. 88 students from 14 schools, representing 7 counties throughout Vermont responded by submitting their essays, from which an independent panel of judges from Vermont’s four corners selected the winners.

Upon graduation from Harvard College in 1978, featured speaker Charlie Smith embarked on a journey that would take him from the halls of Vermont state government to the offices of corporate America and back to Vermont to serve in the Douglas Administration from 2003 to 2006. He served first as Secretary of the Agency of Human Services and then as Secretary of Administration. From mid 2006 to 2009, Smith was called upon to apply his myriad leadership experiences to his role as President of the Snelling Center for Government whose “mission is to foster responsible and ethical civic leadership, encourage public service by private citizens, and promote informed citizen participation in shaping public policy in Vermont.” His lifelong commitment to leadership makes him well suited for the presentation at a luncheon honoring one of our nation’s greatest leaders and celebrating those of the future.

The first, second and third place winners will read their essays at the event. All eight winners will receive their awards: $1,000, First Prize; $750 Second Prize; $500 Third Prize and $200 each for five Honorable Mentions. The Lincoln Essay Competition and annual Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon are sponsored by Spiral Press Café and The Perfect Wife Restaurant..

Reservations are required for the luncheon at a cost of $40 per person. For more information on the event or to reserve a seat, call 802.367.7960 or email Stephanie@hildene.org.

On Friday, January 30 at 5:30 at Hildene’s Welcome Center, distinguished Lincoln scholar and author, Ronald C. White, will talk about his newest book, A. Lincoln: A Biography. Following the presentation there will be a book signing and author reception.

Dr. White received his master of divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary and his doctorate from Princeton University. His new Lincoln biography was preceded by two earlier books: The Eloquent President: A Portrait of Lincoln Through His Words (2005) and Lincoln’s Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural (2002). Noted Lincoln scholar and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Battle Cry of Freedom, James McPherson says of White’s most recent contribution to the growing body of Lincoln literature, “Ronald C. White’s A. Lincoln is the best biography of Lincoln since David Donald’s Lincoln . The special strengths that lift this work above other biographies include a brilliant analysis of Lincoln’s principal speeches and writings. Another strength is White’s analysis of Lincoln’s evolving religious convictions, which shaped the core of his effective leadership, his moral integrity. White’s discussion of Lincoln’s changing attitudes and policies with respect to slavery and race is also a key aspect of this biography. Amid all the books on Lincoln that will be published during the coming year, this one will stand out as one of the best.”

On January 31, Dr. White will deliver the keynote address at the Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon following the presentation of Lincoln Writing Competition Awards at the Equinox Hotel in Manchester. It is anticipated that the author will draw on his vast experience chronicling the life of Lincoln the leader and specifically Lincoln the gifted writer in his remarks to the students, parents, teachers and friends gathered for this annual event honoring the birthday of the nation’s 16th and most revered president.

To learn more about the Ronald C. White author event or to make reservations for the Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon contact Carrie at 802.367.7960 or visit www.hildene.org.

Hildene, The Lincoln Family Home, is especially pleased to announce that in this bicentennial year celebrating the birth of the nation’s 16th and greatest president, the first presentation of the 2009 Winter History Series gives the podium to Executive Director, Seth Bongartz. He will begin with “Lincoln the Leader.” This year’s series of thematically connected lectures will focus on the complexity and character of President Lincoln.

In his talk Bongartz will examine five key decisions made by the president during his tenure, proposing how those decisions provide insight into why Lincoln was such a remarkable leader. The presenter has been honing his own leadership skills lifelong along with a growing respect for the role the Great Emancipator played in American history. Bongartz earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from Skidmore College and his J. D. from Case Western Reserve School of Law in 1987. Prior to taking the helm at Hildene in 2002, he served in the House and Senate of the Vermont State Legislature between 1981 and 1985 and practiced law for more than a decade in Manchester. Admittedly passionate about history, preservation and education and in particular Lincoln’s legacy and the Civil War, when his schedule permits, Bongartz lectures on the topic he will address on the 22nd.

On the fourth Thursday of each month, January through April, each Winter History Series session will begin at 7:00 in the Beckwith Room at the Welcome Center. The 45 minute presentations will be followed by a 30 minute question and answer period and all are free and open to the public. Thursday, February 26, Retired U.S. Naval Academy Professor, Craig Symonds, will speak on Lincoln as Commander in Chief. Anderson University Professor, Brian Dirck, will focus on Lincoln the Lawyer in his Thursday, March 22 lecture. The final lecture in the series entitled Lincoln; A Study in Character will be delivered by Connecticut College Professor Emeritus, Michael Burlingame, on Thursday, April 23.

Hildene’s Museum Store will be open for a cup of coffee and a snack before the event and plentiful parking is available. For further information please call Hildene at 802.367.7960 or email carrie@hildene.org.

In the fall of 2008, based on the successes of the 2006 and 2007 Lincoln Writing Competitions for eighth graders in Bennington County’s public, private and homeshools, Hildene went statewide with an invitation to this same grade level. The expansion is significant and comes at a historic time, during the national Bicentennial Celebration of Abraham Lincoln’s birth. Essays were submitted by students from across the Green Mountain State and then scored by a panel of judges from Vermont’s four corners. The Lincoln Family Home congratulates the winners of the 2008 Hildene Lincoln Writing Competition; First Place, Lillian Dear from Long Trail School, Dorset; Second Place, Julia Gilbert, Main Street Middle School, Monpelier; Third Place, Danielle Liguori, Essex Middle School, Essex Junction; Honorable Mentions, Eliza Farley, Arlington Memorial High School, Arlington and Jordan LaMothe, Long Trail School, Dorset.

The challenge for participating students was to write an essay exploring the meaning of a key sentence from President Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address, arguably his greatest. He wrote, “If we shall suppose that American Slavery is one of those offenses which, in the providence of God, must needs come, but which, having continued through His appointed time, He now wills to remove, and that He gives both the North and South, this terrible war, as the woe due to those by whom the offense came, shall we discern therein any departure from those devine attributes which the believers in a Living God always ascribe to Him?”

There is a strong belief at The Lincoln Family Home that the writing competition fits squarely within Hildene’s mission to: “advance the Lincoln legacy through education, commitment to community and active stewardship of the family’s home and land.”

To show appreciation for the efforts of the essayists and in recognition of their accomplishment, each winner will be Hildene’s guest at the annual Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon at the Equinox Hotel in Manchester. The event will be held on Saturday, January 31, 2009 at 12:00 pm. The first, second and third place winners will read their essays. The keynote address will be delivered by Ronald C. White, Jr., a noted Lincoln scholar and author of several books, including Lincoln’s Greatest Speech: The Second Inaugural. All five winners will also receive their awards; $1,000, First Prize; $750, Second Prize; $500, Third Prize; and $200 each, Honorable Mention. The Lincoln Writing Competition and annual Lincoln’s Birthday Luncheon are sponsored by Spiral Press and The Perfect Wife Restaurant.

Reservations are required for the luncheon at a cost of $30 per person. For more information on the event or to reserve a seat call Programming Director, Carrie Howe at 802.367.7960 or email carrie@hildene.org.

A visit to The Lincoln Family Home for Hildene Holiday Evenings on Sunday, December 28 and Monday, December 29 from 4:30 to 6:30 will provide guests with a rare glimpse of what “Coming Home for the Holidays” might have looked like at the turn of the century. The Lincoln’s home, built in 1905 by Robert Todd Lincoln, President Lincoln’s oldest and only child to survive to adulthood, has the look and feel of the Gilded Age of which Robert and wife Mary Harlan were a part.

Led by Hildene Holiday Decorating co-chairs, Amy Thebault and Corinne Knight, a dedicated volunteer committee has “decked the historic halls” and beyond with fresh pine garlands on the staircase banisters, wreaths aplenty and yards of Victorian satin ribbon and the traditional twelve foot Christmas tree is a beautiful sight in the welcoming center hall, filled with poinsettias. In addition area nursery, floral and interior designers from across The Shires of Vermont have woven their individual brands into the rooms of the century old Vermont retreat that Robert called his ancestral home and that three generations of Lincolns inhabited for 70 years. This year’s guest decorators are Thebault Design, Equinox Valley Nursery, Tara Pollio Floral Design, Hildene Flower Ladies, Lisa Laberge, Nancy Bishop Floral Design and Mettowee Mill Nursery.

With a little help from Mother Nature, guests may have the added benefit of seeing the house in a spectacular snow covered setting. Mistress of the house, Mary Harlan Lincoln described one scene this way in a letter written to close friend, Laura Hollister, on December 31, 1915, “You’ve no idea how beautiful it is up here today. everything covered with the whitest, purest snow I ever saw, and this morning in a beautiful filmy white lace, studded with diamonds. Mr. Lincoln said he never in his whole life saw such a beautiful sight.”

Yearly Hildene Holiday Evenings bring guests from near and far to see The Lincoln Family Home illuminated with candlelight and filled with the musical sounds of the season. The Tall Spire Bellringers from Manchester’s First Congregational Church will play on both evenings from 4:30 to 5:00 and 5:30 to 6:00. Alternating with the bells will be guest organists playing the Lincoln’s 1000 pipe Aeolian organ from 5:00 to 5:30 and 6:00 to 6:30 on both evenings. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the organ, a birthday gift from Robert to Mary in 1908. Such an instrument was considered to be a status symbol at the turn of the century and this organ is the oldest residential pipe organ in the country still located in the original place for which it was purchased. There is a good luck New Year’s bonfire just east of the porte cochere and hot cider and Mrs. Murphy’s donuts await visitors fireside in the Ski Touring Center. There will be carolers at the center on Sunday from 4:30 to 6:30. Whether on foot, by shuttle or on the big red farm wagon, guests will begin and end their holiday evening in the Welcome Center located in the Lincoln’s 100 year old carriage barn. Dressed in all its holiday finery, the spirit of the season abounds in Hildene’s Museum Store where shoppers can expect distinctive items including all things Lincoln, Gilded Age, gardens, history, nature and Vermont.

Admission to this year’s Holiday Evenings, December 28 and 29 is $15 for adults and $5 for children under 14. Members, volunteers and children under 5 are free. The Lincoln Family Home at Hildene is open daily from 9:30 to 4:30. (Closed December 24, 25 and 26 for the holiday.) Regular admission is $12.50 for adults, $5 for youths 6-14, children under 6, Hildene members and volunteers are free. For more information visit www.hildene.org, call 802.362.1788 or email info@hildene.org.

The 2009 Hildene Winter History Series will be decidedly focused on Abraham Lincoln in this 200th anniversary year of his birth. With Lincoln bicentennial celebrations ongoing across the nation, The Lincoln Family Home is pleased to be presenting four thematically unified lectures that look at the complexity and character of the 16th president of the United States. In the 2006 Hildene Winter History Series entitled: “Who is Our Greatest President?” Lincoln earned the majority of attendee’s votes to capture the title over George Washington, Franklin Delano Roosevelt and “sleeper candidate,” John Polk.

On the fourth Thursday of each month, January through April, each Winter History Series session will begin at 7:00 in the Beckwith Room at the Welcome Center. The 45 minute presentations will be followed by a 30 minute question and answer period and all are free and open to the public. On Thursday, January 22, Hildene Executive Director, Seth Bongartz, will present Lincoln the Leader. Thursday, February 26, Retired U.S. Naval Academy Professor, Craig Symonds, will speak on Lincoln as Commander in Chief. Anderson University Professor, Brian Dirck, will focus on Lincoln the Lawyer in his Thursday, March 22 lecture. The final lecture in the series entitled Lincoln; A Study in Character will be delivered by Connecticut College Professor Emeritus, Michael Burlingame, on Thursday, April 23.

Hildene’s Museum Store will be open for a cup of coffee and a snack before the event and plentiful parking is available. For further information please call Hildene at 802.367.7960 or email carrie@hildene.org.

Some snow dreams really do come true and the staff at Hildene’s Ski Touring Center couldn’t be more pleased. The center is now open and cross-country ski and snowshoe enthusiasts are encouraged to take advantage of the approximately 14 kilometers of trails surrounding the historic Lincoln Family Home and covered with a freshly fallen blanket of snow. Ski trail passes may be purchased at the Welcome Center. Hildene members ski free all season.

Since the mid-80’s cross country skiing has consisted of primarily two styles. One is the traditional stride or classical style, the style used at Hildene. The second is freestyle which is significantly faster and incorporates the “skating” technique. For “skate skiers,” the meadow trails are managed to include clear rolled and packed areas. Maintained trails on The Lincoln Family Home’s land are packed and tracked and can accommodate both skiers and snowshoers. While the majority of the terrain is appropriate for novices, advanced skiers looking for quick turns and more downhill trails will find several “black” trails on the property that provide the challenge they seek.

The post and beam style Ski Pavilion is a warm and welcoming shelter with a woodburning stove and staff prepared to assist skiers as needed. Skis, poles and snowshoes are available for rental or skiers may bring their own equipment. Lessons are available by prior arrangement.

The Museum Store has hot chocolate, coffee and snacks available for those wishing to purchase an apres ski treat. Skiers often browse in the Museum Store before heading up to the Lincoln home to learn more about the family. Admission to the historic mansion is complimentary with a ski trail pass.

Based on weather conditions, the Ski Touring Center is open daily from 9:30 to 4:00 pm. All those using trails must sign in at the Welcome Center. The Lincoln Family Home is open daily from 9:30 am to 4:30 pm. For information on rates or conditions, call 802.362.1788 or visit www.hildene.org.

President Abraham Lincoln signed the national proclamation designating the last Thursday of November as a national day of “Thanksgiving” in October 1863. Hopeful that the end of the Civil War was in sight, he believed that the November holiday would give a weary people time to pause and give thanks. Given this historic precedent, it is only natural that the Lincoln Family Home at Hildene, the Georgian Revival home built by the president’s son, Robert Todd Lincoln would mark the beginning of the festive holiday season with Thanksgiving.

Following the Thanksgiving holiday the décor at the home gradually transitions from a harvest theme to that of a Victorian era country retreat at Christmastime. From December 3 through January 1, guests can experience the look and feel of the Gilded Age of which Robert and Mary Lincoln were a part. Hildene Holiday Decorating co-chairs Amy Thebault of Thebault Design and Corinne Knight of Scribbles and their committee have once again organized the annual “decking of the halls” of the Lincoln’s Georgian Revival mansion. Area nursery, floral and interior decorators from across The Shires of Vermont will each weave their own style and creativity into the rooms of the century old mansion, celebrating their art in keeping with the spirit of the Lincoln family’s home. Adding to the beauty of the installations in the rooms and common areas of the estate, are candles in the windows, fresh pine garland on the staircase banisters, wreaths aplenty, yards of Victorian style satin ribbon and the traditional twelve foot Christmas tree proudly standing in the center hall. The committee of volunteers and professional decorators strive to create an experience that delights the senses of visitors of all ages with a feeling of “coming home for the holidays” while creating lasting memories.

During regular hours, 9:30 am to 4:30 pm daily, guests can stroll through the mansion with interpreters and staff on hand to answer questions about the home’s history and famous inhabitants. There will be two Hildene Holiday Evenings on Sunday, December 28 and Monday, December 29, from 4:30 to 6:30. This celebrated annual event brings guests from near and far to see the Lincoln’s home illuminated with candlelight and filled with the musical sounds of the season, including handbells, piano and the Aeolian pipe organ. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the organ, a birthday gift from Robert to his wife, Mary, in 1908. There is a good luck New Year’s bonfire in the yard and hot cider and Mrs. Murphys’ donuts await visitors fireside in the Ski Touring Center on their way back to the Welcome Center and Museum Store.

Regular admission for exhibits, house and grounds is $12.50 for adults and $5 for children under 14. Members, volunteers and children under 5 are free. Admission to this year’s Holiday Evenings, December 28 and 29 is $15 for adults and $5 for children under 14. Members, volunteers and children under 5 are free. Parking is at the Welcome Center. There will be a shuttle available to the house. For more information please call Hildene at 802.362.1788.

Hildene was recently named the recipient of a Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund Grant. The award will be used to install solar energy panels on the roof of the newly dedicated Rowland Agricultural Center located on the 10 acre meadow of the Lincoln family’s Manchester estate. The new barn was constructed and designed to utilize renewable energy resources from solar and wood fuel and was placed on the site specifically to meet this objective.

David O’Brien, Commissioner of the Department of Public Service notes that, “The development of clean energy projects remains key to Vermont’s energy future and the Clean Energy Development Fund continues to prompt creative and actionable ideas in new generation.” Driven by its mission, “to advance the Lincoln legacy through education, commitment to community, and active stewardship of the family’s home and land,” Hildene believes their clean energy initiative will demonstrate its commitment to stewardship and community. Executive Director, Seth Bongartz stated, “It is our intent that the installation of a cost effective and environmentally sustainable solar electric power resource will serve as a prototype for others to replicate while benefiting Vermont in the long term.” With educational programming a top priority for Hildene, the renewable energy project provides yet another opportunity to focus the attention of students on the importance of clean and renewable energy. To this end, educational components such as programming and interpretive displays at the barn will lend support to this belief. As a major attraction, Hildene is also positioned to illustrate to its more than 40,000 annual visitors that solar power is a viable and reliable alternative to traditional methods. They expect, when completed, this facility will be able to demonstrate the systems, technology and philosophy that form a sustainable and carefully conceived strategy that approaches net zero use of non-renewable energy.

There is great excitement at The Lincoln Family Home about the solar project and the new agricultural complex. Consistent with their 25 year forest management plan, the Rowland Agricultural Center is constructed with timber harvested and milled from the woodlands of the Lincoln family’s 412 acre estate, part of a closed loop system. The 40 by 100 foot barn is designed specifically to house a goat herd and for viewing cheesemaking from the milking of the goats to the processing of a signature Hildene Farm cheese. It is anticipated that given its location in The Shires of Vermont, and Hildene’s commitment to promoting the state’s cheesemakers, the Center will become a resource for visitors to discover the wide variety of artisan cheeses available statewide on the Vermont Cheese Trail. Upon completion, planned for summer 2009, it will become another part of the Hildene experience for guests and serve as an example of small scale sustainable farming in the Green Mountain State. Additionally, as a result of the Clean Energy Development Grant the entire agricultural center project will become a valuable teaching tool for generations to come on the importance of renewable clean energy generation.

To learn more about the work of the Vermont Department of Public Service visit http://publicservice.vermont.gov.

The Hildene Trustees recently welcomed two new board members: Perez Ehrich and Tony Hoyt. Both men will bring their diverse backgrounds and a breadth of experience to bear on their roles as trustees.

Perez Ehrich earned his BA from Harvard College, Juris Doctor from New York Law School and in 1976, his LLM from New York University School of Law. He practiced corporate and finance law in New York until 1997 when he returned to his native Vermont to join his brother Terry, in publishing Hemmings Motor News. Ehrich brings his lifelong dedication to education, the environment and social responsibility to the Hildene board at a time of growth at The Lincoln Family Home that is focused on education and scholarship, sustainability and stewardship of the family’s home and land.

Perez resides in Arlington with his wife, Elizabeth and in addition to serving on a number of non-profit boards, enjoys small scale pasture farming and time with his five grown children and four grandchildren.

Born and raised in Cold Spring Harbor, New York, Tony Hoyt is a University of Virginia alumnus and currently serves as a member of the university’s President’s Council for the Arts. He is a well known and highly respected publishing and marketing executive with more than 30 years of experience in the world of advertising and magazines, including stints with media giants, Hearst Magazines and American Media, Inc. On the heals of his successful career in publishing, Hoyt took the helm as Senior Vice President of the Magazine Division of Digital: Convergence Corporation. Digital Convergence was a technology start-up company that manufactured and distributed the Cue Cat, an optical barcode reader for magazines, newspapers and catalogues. He is the founder and current CEO of Tony Hoyt and Associates, a publishing consulting firm.

A resident of Vermont, Tony splits his time between his Upper East Side New York apartment and his home on Tollgate Road in Manchester. He is the father of two grown children, Betsy and Bobby, and has a lifelong connection to the Manchester area dating back to his own childhood and weekends spent with his aunt and uncle, Lyn and Win Hoyt.

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